Resilient Management, An Excerpt

Resilient Management, An Excerpt

Tuckman’s Stages of Group Development, the Storming stage happens as a group begins to figure out how to work together. Previously, each person had been doing their own thing as individuals, so necessarily a few things need to be ironed out: how to collaborate, how to hit goals, how to determine priorities. Of course there may be some friction here!But even if your team doesn’t noticeably demonstrate this kind of internal Storming as they begin to gel, there might be some outside factors at play in your work environment that create friction. During times of team scaling and organizational change—the water we in the web industry are often swimming in—managers are responsible for things like strategy-setting, aligning their team’s work to company objectives, and unblocking the team as they ship their work.

In addition to these business-context responsibilities, managers need to be able to help their teammates navigate this storm by helping them grow in their roles and support the team’s overall progress. If you and your teammates don’t adapt and evolve in your roles, it’s unlikely that your team will move out of the Storming stage and into the Norming stage of team dynamics.

To spur this course-correction and growth in your teammates, you’ll end up wearing four different hats:

  • Mentoring: lending advice and helping to problem solve based on your own experience.
  • Coaching: asking open questions to help your teammate reflect and introspect, rather than sharing your own opinions or quickly problem solving.
  • Sponsoring: finding opportunities for your teammate to level up, take on new leadership roles, and get promoted.
  • Delivering feedback: observing behavior that is or isn’t aligned to what the team needs to be doing and sharing those observations, along with praise or suggestions.

Let’s dive in to how to choose, and when to use, each of
these skills as you grow your teammates, and then talk about
what it looks like when teammates support the overarching
direction of the team.

When I talk to managers, I find that the vast majority have their
mentor hats on ninety percent of the time when they’re working with their
teammates. It’s natural!

In mentoring mode, we’re doling out advice, sharing our perspective,
and helping someone else problem solve based on that information. Our personal
experiences are often what we can talk most confidently about! For this reason,
mentorship mode can feel really good and effective for the mentor. Having that
mentor hat on can help the other person overcome a roadblock or know which next
steps to take, while avoiding drastic errors that they wouldn’t have seen
coming otherwise.

As a mentor, it’s your responsibility to give advice that’s current and sensitive to the changing dialog happening in our industry. Advice that might work for one person (“Be louder in meetings!” or “Ask your boss for a raise!”) may undermine someone else, because members of underrepresented groups are unconsciously assessed and treated differently. For example, research has shown that “when women are collaborative and communal, they are not perceived as competent—but when they emphasize their competence, they’re seen as cold and unlikable, in a classic ‘double bind’”.

If you are not a member of a marginalized group, and you have a
mentee who is, please be a responsible mentor! Try to be aware of the
way members of underrepresented groups are perceived, and the unconscious bias
that might be at play in your mentee’s work environment. When you have your
mentor hat on, do lots of gut checking to make sure that your advice is going
to be helpful in practice for your mentee.

Mentoring is ideal when the mentee is new to their role or to the
organization; they need to learn the ropes from someone who has firsthand
experience. It’s also ideal when your teammate is working on a problem and has
tried out a few different approaches, but still feels stumped; this is why
practices like pair coding can help folks learn new things.

As mentors, we want our mentees to reach beyond us, because our mentees’ success is ultimately our success. Mentorship relationships evolve over time, because each party is growing. Imaginative, innovative ideas often come from people who have never seen a particular challenge before, so if your mentee comes up with a creative solution on their own that you wouldn’t have thought of, be excited for them—don’t just focus on the ways that you’ve done it or seen it done before.

Managers often default to mentoring mode because it feels like the fastest way to solve a problem, but it falls short in helping your teammate connect their own dots. For that, we’ll look to coaching.

In mentoring mode, you’re focused on both the problem and the solution. You’ll share what you as the mentor would do or have done in this situation. This means you’re more focused on yourself, and less on the person who is sitting in front of you.

In coaching mode—an extremely powerful but often underutilized mode—you’re doing two primary things:

  1. Asking open questions to help the other person explore more of the shape of the topic, rather than staying at the surface level.
  2. Reflecting, which is like holding up a mirror for the other person and describing what you see or hear, or asking them to reflect for themselves.

These two tools will help you become your teammate’s fiercest champion.

Open Questions

“Closed” questions can only be answered with yes or no.
Open questions often start with who, what, when, where,
why, and how. But the best open questions are about the
problem, not the solution. Questions that start with why tend to make
the other person feel judged, and questions that start with how tend
to go into problem solving mode—both of which we want to avoid while in
coaching mode.

However, what questions can be authentically curious!
When someone comes to you with a challenge, try asking questions like:

  • What’s most important to you about it?
  • What’s holding you back?
  • What does success look like?

Let’s say my teammate comes to me and says they’re ready for a
promotion. Open questions could help this teammate explore what this promotion
means and demonstrate to me what introspection they’ve already done around it.
Rather than telling them what I think is necessary for them to be promoted, I
could instead open up this conversation by asking them:

  • What would you be able to do in the new level
    that you can’t do in your current one?
  • What skills are required in the new level? What
    are some ways that you’ve honed those skills?
  • Who are the people already at that level that
    you want to emulate? What about them do you want to emulate?

Their answers would give me a place to start coaching. These questions might push my teammate to think more deeply about what this promotion means, rather than allowing them to stay surface level and believe that a promotion is about checking off a lot of boxes on a list. Their answers might also open my eyes to things that I hadn’t seen before, like a piece of work that my teammate had accomplished that made a huge impact. But most important, going into coaching mode would start a two-way conversation with this teammate, which would help make an otherwise tricky conversation feel more like a shared exploration.

Open
questions, asked from a place of genuine curiosity, help people feel seen and
heard. However, if the way you ask your questions comes across as judgy or like
you’ve already made some assumptions, then your questions aren’t truly open
(and your teammate can smell this on you!). Practice your intonation to make
sure your open questions are actually curious and open.

By the way, forming lots of open questions (instead of problem solving questions, or giving advice) is tremendously hard for most people. Don’t worry if you don’t get the hang of it at first; it takes a lot of practice and intention over time to default to coaching mode rather than mentoring mode. I promise, it’s worth it.

Reflections

Just like open questions, reflections help the other person feel
seen and heard, and to explore the topic more deeply.

It’s almost comical how rarely we get the sense that the person
we’re talking to is actively listening to us, or focusing entirely on helping
us connect our own dots. Help your teammates reflect by repeating back to them
what you hear them say, as in:

  • “What I’m hearing you say is that you’re
    frustrated with how this project is going. Is that right?”
  • “What I know to be true about you is how deeply
    you care about your teammates’ feelings.”

In each of these
examples, you are holding up a metaphorical mirror to your teammate, and
helping them look into it. You can coach them to reflect, too:

  • “How does this new architecture project map to
    your goals?”
  • “Let’s reflect on where you were this time last
    year and how far you’ve come.”

Occasionally, you might get a reflection wrong; this gives the
other person an opportunity to realize something new about their topic, like
the words they’re choosing aren’t quite right, or there’s another underlying
issue that should be explored. So don’t be worried about giving a bad
reflection; reflecting back what you’re hearing will still help your teammate.

The act of reflecting can help the other person do a gut check to
make sure they’re approaching their topic holistically. Sometimes the act of
reflection forces (encourages?) the other person to do some really hard work: introspection.
Introspection creates an opportunity for them to realize new aspects of the
problem, options they can choose from, or deeper meanings that hadn’t occurred
to them before—which often ends up being a nice shortcut to the right solution.
Or, even better, the right problem statement.

When you have your coaching hat on, you don’t need to have all the answers, or even fully understand the problem that your teammate is wrestling with; you’re just there as a mirror and as a question-asker, to help prompt the other person to think deeply and come to some new, interesting conclusions. Frankly, it may not feel all that effective when you’re in coaching mode, but I promise, coaching can generate way more growth for that other person than just giving them advice or sharing your perspective.

Choose coaching when you’re looking to help someone (especially an emerging leader) hone their strategic thinking skills, grow their leadership aptitude, and craft their own path forward. Coaching mode is all about helping your teammate develop their own brain wrinkles, rather than telling them how you would do something. The introspection and creativity it inspires create deeper and longer-lasting growth.

While you wear the mentoring and coaching hats around your
teammates, the sponsor hat is more often worn when they’re not around,
like when you’re in a 1:1 with your manager, a sprint planning meeting, or
another environment where someone’s work might be recognized. You might hear
about an upcoming project to acquire a new audience and recommend that a
budding user researcher take it on, or you’ll suggest to an All Hands meeting
organizer that a junior designer should give a talk about a new pattern they’ve
introduced to the style guide.

Sponsorship is all about feeling on the hook for getting
someone to the next level. As someone’s sponsor, you’ll put their name in the
ring for opportunities that will get them the experience and visibility
necessary to grow in their role and at the organization. You will put your
personal reputation on the line on behalf of the person you’re sponsoring, to
help get them visible and developmental assignments. It’s a powerful tool, and
the one most effective at helping someone get to the next level (way more so
than mentoring or coaching!).

The Center for Talent Innovation routinely measures the career benefits of sponsorship (PDF). Their studies have found that when someone has a sponsor, they are way more likely to have access to career-launching work. They’re also more likely to take actions that lead to even more growth and opportunities, like asking their manager for a stretch assignment or a raise.

When you’re in sponsorship mode, think about the different
opportunities you have to offer up someone’s name. This might look like:

  • giving visible/public recognition (company
    “shout outs,” having them present a project demo, thanking them in a launch
    email, giving someone’s manager feedback about their good work);
  • assigning stretch tasks and projects that are just
    beyond
    their current skill set, to help them grow and have supporting
    evidence for a future promotion; or
  • opening the door for them to write blog posts,
    give company or conference talks, or contribute open-source work.

Remember that members of underrepresented groups are typically over-mentored, but under-sponsored. These individuals get lots of advice (often unsolicited), coffee outings, and offers to teach them new skills. But it’s much rarer for them to see support that looks like sponsorship.

This isn’t because sponsors intentionally ignore marginalized folks, but because of in-group bias. Because of how our brains (and social networks) work, the people we’re closest to tend to look mostly like us—and we draw from that same pool when we nominate people for projects, for promotions, and for hires. Until I started learning about bias in the workplace, most of the people I sponsored were white, cisgender women, like myself. Since then, I’ve actively worked to sponsor people of color and nonbinary people. It takes effort and intention to combat our default behaviors—but I know you can do it!

Take a look at the daily communications you participate in: your work chat logs, the conversations you have with others, the process for figuring out who should fix a bug or work on a new project, and the processes for making your teams’ work visible (like an architecture review, code review, launch calendar, etc.). You’ll be surprised how many moments there are to sponsor someone throughout an average day. Please put in the time and intention to ensure that you’re sponsoring members of underrepresented groups, too.

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